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Over the past two decades, the discovery of CRISPR-Cas immune systems and the repurposing of their effector nucleases as biotechnological tools have revolutionized genome editing. In the recently published paper "Determination of factors driving the genome editing field in the CRISPR era using bibliometrics," VantagePoint  was used to analyze 90,000 authors representing 7,600 affiliations in 126 countries, who have published more than 19,000 papers spanning medicine, agriculture, and biotechnology. Here, we use tech mining and an integrated bibliometric and networks framework to investigate the CRISPR literature over three time periods. The analysis identified seminal papers, leading authors, influential journals, and rising applications and topics interconnected through collaborative networks. A core set of foundational topics gave rise to diverging avenues of research and applications, reflecting a bona fide disruptive emerging technology. This analysis illustrates how bibliometrics can identify key factors, decipher rising trends, and untangle emerging applications and technologies that dynamically shape a morphing field, and provides insights into the trajectory of genome editing

The unprecedented, explosive growth of the COVID-19 domain presents challenges to researchers to keep up with research knowledge within the domain. In the paper "Tracking and Mining the COVID-19 Research Literature" this research is profiled to help make that knowledge more accessible via overviews and novel categorizations. Porter et. al. provide websites offering means for researchers to probe more deeply to address specific questions. The authors further probe and reassemble COVID-19 topical content to address research issues concerning topical evolution and emphases on tactical vs. strategic approaches to mitigate this pandemic and reduce future viral threats. Data suggest that heightened attention to strategic, immunological factors is warranted. Connecting with, and transferring in, research knowledge from outside the COVID-19 domain demands a viable COVID-19 knowledge model. This study provides complementary topical categorizations to facilitate such modeling to inform future Literature-Based Discovery (LBD) endeavors.